The Pillars of Sacred Activism Interfaith Shared Values of Active Opposition to Evil

Themis Titaness of Justice (unknown artist) ca. 2012

Themis Titaness of Justice (unknown artist) ca. 2012

D (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.orgDeeply rooted in the ancient principles of Chivalry, the medieval Knights Templar were dedicated to applying spirituality to effect positive change in society, by taking manifest action in the world, as the Templar way of life.  Such social activism was thus an essential expression of authentic Templar Spirituality.  This sacred tradition and practical discipline is best known in the modern era as “Sacred Activism”.

The prominent French historian Emile Leon Gautier (1832-1897 AD), an Archivist of the Imperial Archives and Chief Historian of the National Archives in Paris, France, in his landmark reconstruction of the Code of Chivalry, explained key elements of Templar Sacred Activism:

“The faith of these rude warriors, that Faith which was so precise, had nothing namby-pamby [whimpy] in it: nothing dilettante [delicate]…  They knew too much to stand upon the sterile heights of theory: they knew that they ought to practice their Faith. …  Our Knights did not remain content with the mere belief in God.”  Gautier thus summarized that the essence of Chivalry was “armed force in the service of unarmed Truth” [1].  Precisely for this reason, the Temple Rule defined the Order as “Religion by armed Knighthood” (Rule 57) [2].

The ancient Code of Chivalry of 1066 AD features three commandments among the 10 Pillars of Chivalry, which also serve as the primary Pillars of Sacred Activism [3]:

“Believe in spiritual teachings and apply them in daily life” (1st Pillar), meaning that spirituality must be manifested as actions in the world; “Perform all secular duties under the higher laws of God” (7th Pillar), meaning that our secular worldly actions should be governed by our spiritual values; “Always uphold right and good, against all evil and injustice” (10th Pillar), meaning that we must uphold spiritual values with vigilance, by engaging in practical activism, actively opposing all wrongdoing and injustice.

The Temple Rule of 1129 AD, as the founding Charter of the Templar Order, establishes the core tradition of Sacred Activism, that spirituality must be implemented through action, and that rightful action enhances one’s spirituality:

It describes knighthood and damehood as “being servants… for the salvation of your souls… for the purpose of divine service” (Rule 9), for those “who desire with a pure heart to serve” (Rule 66), “who wish to serve in charity… for the salvation of their souls” (Rule 67) [4].  This expresses both that spiritual devotion is needed to effectively serve, and also that active service in this way brings spiritual fulfillment.

The Temple Rule dedicates the Order to “the love of Justice” which constitutes its duties” (Rule 2), requires that all wrongdoing must be punished “for the love of Justice” to protect the innocent (Rule 47), mandates Templars to “govern justly” (Rule 57), and commands Knights and Dames “for the love of Truth… to Judge the matter” by serving as Judges over disputes whenever requested (Rule 59) [5].

The Templar Order was thus founded upon a mandate for Sacred Activism, opposing all forms of iniquity, wrongdoing or abuses of power in society, described as upholding the principles of Justice.  The Templar concept of “Justice” was pervasive, including civil and criminal justice, as well as economic justice, civil rights and human rights.

The Templar Code of 1150 AD (distilled from the Temple Rule) further highlights the core spirit of Templar Sacred Activism.  It commands to:  “Use one’s strength only to protect and uphold the weak” (4th Pillar), “Always uphold and represent Justice with fairness” (5th Pillar), and “Actively pursue scholarly studies of the Truth” (6th Pillar) [6].

This Sacred Activism was most famously exemplified by the Knights Templar as promoters, protectors and enforcers of the Magna Carta Libertatum, Latin for the “Great Charter of Liberties”, in direct opposition to arbitrary abuses of power.  The Charter is widely considered the basis for Common Law [7], as the first major law establishing civil rights and human rights, setting the precedent for all 18th century Bills of Rights, and becoming the foundation of the modern UN Declaration of Human Rights [8].

The Magna Carta was imposed upon King John of England in 1215 AD by the “Baron’s War” of noblemen, led by the Templar Knight Robert Fitzwalter [9] [10], with most of the key confrontations taking place at Temple Church, the headquarters of the Temple Order in London [11], attended by a group of armed Knights in full Templar regalia [12] [13].  Overcoming resistance from abusive leaders, the Charter was repeatedly reissued from 1216 to 1225 AD by the Templar Knight William Marshall (whose effigy is displayed in Temple Church), finally installing it as the basis for Common Law rights [14] [15].

 

Sacred Activism to Uphold Good Over Evil

 

'Praying with a Rose Hilted Sword' by Dan Dos Santos (ca. 2014)

‘Praying with a Rose Hilted Sword’ by Dan Dos Santos (ca. 2014)

T (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.orgThe British Knight, Sir Robert Murray Hyslop of the Free Church Council, refined the modern saying which best encapsulates the power of Sacred Activism, in 1920 AD:

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men should do nothing. …  Cowardice will suffice for its triumph.  Courage will suffice for its overthrow.” [16]

Sir Hyslop’s famous maxim was based on a speech by the British political philosopher John Stuart Mill in 1867 AD:  “Bad men need nothing more to compass their ends, than that good men should look on and do nothing.” [17] The original concept is often attributed to the Irish statesman Edmund Burke, who wrote in 1770 AD:

When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.” [18]

For this compelling reason, the Temple Rule features an essential part of Sacred Activism, that of actively gathering and unifying other like-minded activists for cooperation.  It commands Knights and Dames to proactively seek out and recruit good people to join the Templar missions:  “There where you know to be gathered Knights… there we command you to go… if there is anyone who wishes to serve and join the Order” (Rule 12) [19].

Precisely because in modern society too many “good men do nothing”, and because even the smallest resistance is sufficient to disrupt unsustainable wrongdoing and mobilize the forces of good, those few decisive positive actions have a disproportionately powerful impact.  For these reasons, the American cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978) declared this wisdom of historical truth:

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” [20]

The Romanian human rights activist Elie Wiesel, in his acceptance speech as a Nobel Peace Laureate in 1986, confirmed this maxim of Margaret Mead, declaring:  “One person of integrity can make a difference, a difference of life and death.” [21]

Perhaps there is no better example of this Truth than the historical Knights Templar:  The Templar Order was established in 1118 AD with “only nine” founding members [22], being “nine noble Knights… animated by the sacredness of the cause” [23].  They admitted hardly any members during the first 10 years, while they focused on excavating the Temple of Solomon [24] [25] [26].

The Vatican noted: “As an army they were never very numerous”, having only “400 Knights in Jerusalem at the zenith [peak] of their prosperity…  But it was a picked [select] body of men who, by their noble example, inspirited the remainder of the Christian forces.” [27] Although the Templars developed into an estimated 3,000 Knights and Dames [28], the Temple Rule evidences that the Order was traditionally led by a Grand Mastery of only 13 Knights (Rule 207, Rule 215, Rule 216) [29].

Beginning with only nine Knights, and generally led by only 13 Knights, the Templar Order transformed all of Western civilization, leading it into the progress of the Renaissance, leaving the Gothic Cathedrals of Europe as its monuments, and centuries of passionate inspiration persisting into the modern era as its legacy.

Elie Wiesel further emphasized the profound importance of such small groups taking positive action:  “We must take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.  Sometimes we must interfere.” [30]

These gems of traditional folk wisdom are the cornerstone of the concept of Sacred Activism, rooted in the most ancient idea of the “spiritual warrior”, as the foundation of the medieval model of the “warrior monk” embodied in the Order of the Temple of Solomon as the legendary Knights Templar.

The core of Sacred Activism is the principle that spirituality without social action fails to uphold spiritual values, and that social action without spirituality fails to uphold the foundations of a healthy society:

When spiritual seekers do not actively manifest sacred values in society, this enables and facilitates worldly institutions undermining human rights and civil liberties including religious freedoms, and dismantling traditional positive values.  When social activists are not anchored in spiritual wisdom and inspiration to support their inner strength and positive mental focus, they suffer physical and emotional “burn out” which undermines effective activism.  Spirituality and activism are thus two halves of a whole, both of which have maximum impact only when practiced together.

Sacred Activism, often called “compassion in action”, is the practical application of universal values of the ancient Sacred Wisdom, as the underlying foundations of all religions, with active participation in upholding the pillars of civilization.  Accordingly, Sacred Activism is the interfaith practice of timeless positive values from unifying principles of spirituality, using this collective heritage of humanity as a force for change.

For individuals to simply “be spiritual” only for themselves, only in private, or only in Church on Sundays, without expressing those values through real-world action, is the same as for “good men to do nothing”, allowing for “evil to triumph” unchallenged.  Therefore, Sacred Activism is the essential means for humanity to prevail in the eternal battle of good against evil, right over wrong, truth over falsehood, freedom over tyranny, rights over oppression, and well-being over suffering.

 

The Power of Truth & Knowledge

 

'Girl Leaning on a Lion' by Dark Angel Digital Imaging (2016)

‘Girl Leaning on a Lion’ by Dark Angel Digital Imaging (2016)

I (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.orgIn modern times, the battle of good against evil is rarely fought by physical violence, and is increasingly waged through the communication of ideas, in the form of Sacred Activism.  The new “weapons” of chivalric Knights and Dames are primarily “legal warfare”, upholding the Rule of Law by protecting rights against abuses, and “information warfare” upholding all religion and positive traditional values against secular propaganda.

“Knowledge is Power” from the Truth – The core essence of Sacred Activism is to promote the Truth, by spreading factual knowledge, as the essential means to empower humanity against the deceptions and manipulations of evil.

Jesus declared:  “And ye shall know the Truth, and the Truth shall make you free.” (John 8:32)  Sir Francis Bacon famously stated in 1597 AD:  “Knowledge is power.”  The American politician Horace Mann in the 19th century confirmed:  “Every addition to true knowledge is an addition to human power.”

For these reasons, the Temple Rule highlights the integrity and authority of “whose who [are] lovers of Truth” (Rule 6), commands to “study universally” to research, expose and promote Truth (Rule 9), and instructs Knights and Dames to administer Justice “for the love of Truth” (Rule 59) [30].  An unwavering commitment and disciplined efforts to uncover and restore Truth for the peoples of the world thus forms the backbone of Templar Sacred Activism.

“The Pen is Mightier than the Sword” – The written word is traditionally considered both preferable to – and more powerful than – the use of violence or force.  This principle originates from the Sacred Wisdom of the Ancient Magi Priesthood of Melchizedek, found in the Assyrian Teachings of Ahiquar ca. 650 BC:  “The word is mightier than the sword.” [31] This same doctrine is reflected in the New Testament referring to the power of the Word of God:  “Take… the sword of the Spirit, which is the Word of God” (Ephesians 6:17); “For the Word of God is… sharper than any two-edged sword” (Hebrews 4:12).

This ancient and classical teaching was most famously expressed by the Victorian era British playwright Lord Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839 AD, in the classic line spoken by the character of a Vatican Cardinal:  “The pen is mightier than the sword. …  Take away the sword – States can be saved without it!”  [33]

Unequivocally confirming and endorsing the power and supremacy of the word over physical force, the Temple Rule cites ancient scripture, that: “Life and death are in the power of the tongue.” (Rule 32) [34].

In relation to this central Templar doctrine of Sacred Activism, as documented by the historian Gautier, new Knights were commanded: “Receive this sword in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost… Go, and remember that the Saints did not conquer kingdoms by the sword but by Faith.” [35]

For all of these reasons, the original Knights Templar themselves created the whole literary genre of Arthurian Legends of the Holy Grail [36].  Historians established that “the very first Grail Story” was written by Chretien de Troyes ca. 1188 AD, “in the very city where Templarism was born, Troyes”, where Saint Bernard wrote the Rule of the Order, and that “from first to last, Templars… either wrote or sanctioned many of the Grail stories.” [37]

Such Templar literature successfully preserved and actively promoted the values of Chivalry, and the doctrines of Templar Spirituality, through the attractive expressions of ancient Celtic mythology.  These writings effectively inspired many centuries of future generations to pursue esoteric sacred wisdom, practice spiritual alchemy and mysticism, and study the sacred sciences.  The Grail Legends presented all of this spirituality with a unique focus on the personal Holy Quest, as the practical application of spirituality in action through Chivalry, reflecting the medieval origins of Sacred Activism.

Giving a Voice to the Oppressed – Nobel Laureate Elie Wiesel highlighted that beyond the power of Truth to cause positive change, Sacred Activism exposing Truth is necessary to give a voice to the oppressed:

“There is so much injustice and suffering crying out for our attention…  Human rights are being violated on every continent. …  What all these victims need above all is to know that they are not alone; that we are not forgetting them, that when their voices are stifled we shall lend them ours; that while their freedom depends on ours, the quality of our freedom depends on theirs.” [38]

 

Spiritual Aspects of Sacred Activism

 

Lady Anna and her Owl Senia, photo shoot by Danila Neroznak (Russia) 2014

Lady Anna and her Owl Senia, photo shoot by Danila Neroznak (Russia) 2014

S (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.orgSaint Paul of the Apostles explained the basic Christian concept of the battle of good against evil, as follows:  “For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.” (Ephesians 6:12)

This highlights that the proverbial “battle” is not necessarily physical, nor is it only political, but is primarily spiritual, which confirms the importance of Sacred Activism.  While the struggle to defend goodness and positive values requires vigilance and action, the focus of such action is to promote spiritual values for the benefit of humanity.  Likewise, the focus of writing and communication promoting Truth is also to advance spiritual values, to empower humanity to expose and reject evil, setting the people free to achieve a greater civilization.

Representing Spiritual Values – Recognizing the broader context of spiritual warfare, the Temple Rule commands Knights and Dames “to live without reproach”, primarily to uphold and thereby promote “the purposes of religion”, as they “set an example of good works”, so that others “will be bestowed with honour” (Rule 37) [39].

Accordingly, an essential aspect of the practice of Sacred Activism is to set a positive example of spirituality in action, through one’s own right action and honourable behaviour.  This key element serves to uplift and inspire others, promoting values of inherent goodness, and motivating others to take decisive action with a sense of higher purpose.

In this way, by preserving and representing the principles of spirituality, we can inspire and empower others to become sacred activists, thereby creating future generations of Sacred Activism for the benefit of humanity.  (Note that “humanity” includes the shared aspects of humanity which we also find in animals as our fellow creatures in this world.)

Spiritual Grounding for Balanced Activism – While actively opposing wrongdoing or agendas which are driven by forces of evil, it is all too easy to demonize all antagonists as “enemies” or “criminals”, and too tempting for the ego to see oneself as the “hero” or “avenger”.  This leads to an inflated sense of moral superiority, further leading to the mistake of engaging in aggression, blinding one to the greater power of balanced action through sacred wisdom.  The essential balance must be achieved through spiritual grounding and introspection, which is best accomplished through a discipline of meditation.

The Swiss scientist and psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961), who worked closely with Sigmund Freud, studied the importance of examining and purging one’s “shadow” of spiritual darkness, to avoid psychological “projection” of one’s own flaws upon others.  This practice, known as “shadow work”, is done by introspective meditation.  As Carl Jung explained:

“If you imagine someone who is brave enough to withdraw all his projections, then you get an individual who is conscious of a pretty thick shadow.  Such a man… is now unable to say that ‘they’ do this or that, ‘they’ are wrong, and ‘they’ must be fought against… Such a man knows that whatever is wrong in the world is in himself, and if he only learns to deal with his own shadow he has done something real in the world.” [40]

Carl Jung also noted that the need for such “shadow work” is a prominent teaching of many traditions of ancient Eastern spirituality.  The Hindu Saint, Swami Sri Yukteswar, the Guru of Paramahansa Yogananda, taught:  “The vanished lives of all men are dark with many shames.  Human conduct is ever unreliable until man is anchored in the Divine.” [41]

For these reasons, the Temple Rule features a prominent theme of commanding all Templars to strictly avoid pride which inflates the ego:  It requires all Knights and Dames to engage in “studious purification” (Rule 1), to be “without any arrogance and without any show of pride” (Rule 18), forbids any “pride or arrogance” (Rule 19), and instructs that “no person shall be elevated” and to “not become proud” even in one’s expressions of apparent humility (Rule 34). [42]

Hate the Sin but Not the Sinner – The desired spiritual balance, avoiding the prejudicial vilifying of individuals by condemning whole groups, is also achieved through a related key principle:  While wrongdoing itself must be categorically condemned, we must also show compassion for the wrongdoer as a human being.  The traditional Christian expression of this concept is: “Hate the sin, but Love the sinner”, first formulated by Saint Augustine in 424 AD as: “With love for mankind and hatred for sins”, and popularized by Mohandas Gandhi in 1929 AD as: “Hate the sin and not the sinner” [43].

Strategy of Overcoming Evil with Good – Just as the psychological trap of vilifying all opponents interferes with one’s spiritual balance, it also objectively undermines a very practical approach to the most effective activism by strategic balance.

Most wrongdoing and injustice is promoted by subversive elitist groups, typically as self-styled “Secret Societies”, promoting anti-humanitarian philosophies to justify their supposed “superiority” over humanity.  Such groups are inherently unsustainable, as their philosophies make them necessarily (and inevitably) abusive of their own supporters.

Strategically, it is important to remember that many members of such groups are coerced, unwilling or unknowing participants, most of whom would leave the group, actively help to stop its wrongdoing, and become whistleblowers and even prosecution witnesses, if only given the safe alternative of joining the forces of good.

Through the wisdom of compassion, activists can erode the membership base of negative groups, by winning over individuals with honour and goodness.  This is the supreme power of Sacred Activism:  By embodying the forces of good on behalf of all humanity, Truth has the overwhelming power to convert even enemies into newfound supporters of the good.  Perhaps best expressing this winning strategy, the Apostles taught: “Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good.” (Romans 12:17-21)

Based upon this understanding, the Code of Chivalry highlights the importance of behaving with honour and integrity even towards apparent enemies:  “Never lie nor breach your word, be reliable for friend or foe” (8th Pillar) [44].  Being “reliable” means clearly declaring one’s determination to strongly intervene in any wrongdoing, while pledging one’s support for those who choose to cease and repent.  The practice of being reliable even to opponents is thus a deterrent against their wrongdoing, as well as an invitation or opportunity for them to join the forces of good.

 

The Code of Sacred Activism

 

A (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.orgAll of the above principles, deeply rooted in the ancient Code of Chivalry of 1066 AD, the medieval Temple Rule of 1129 AD, the Templar Code of 1150 AD, and the timeless practice of Templar Spirituality, combine to establish a comprehensive system of Sacred Activism.  This living tradition was distilled and consolidated, by Prince Matthew of Thebes in 2016, resulting in the Code of Sacred Activism suitable for real-world practice in the modern era.

 

The Ten Pillars of the Code of Sacred Activism:

  1. Apply spiritual values through manifest action in the world
  2. Conduct oneself in accordance with inherently positive values
  3. Use daily meditation to strengthen and balance one’s activism
  4. Practice introspection for balance with humility and compassion
  5. Actively oppose all forms of wrongdoing and injustice in society
  6. Promote unity and cooperation for mutual support among activists
  7. Discover and promote Truth against all deception affecting society
  8. Actively use the power of the word as the primary weapon of good
  9. Give a voice to the oppressed, to promote awareness and support
  10. Remember that courage of the few has power to change the world

 

These Pillars encapsulate the spiritual and practical path of Sacred Activism, as an essential part of the authentic Templar way of life, which guides the missions and projects of the restored Templar Order in the modern era.

 

Academic Source References for This Topic

 

[1] Emile Leon Gautier, La Chevalerie (1883); Translated in: Henry Frith, Chivalry, George Routledge & Sons, London (1891), reconstructed from historical sources since ca. 1066 AD, Chapter II, Part I, Part II.

[2] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 57.

[3] Prince Matthew of Thebes, The Code of Chivalry of 1066 AD: The Universal Code of Knighthood, Sovereign Magistral Order of the Temple of Solomon (2015); Restored and updated from:  Emile Leon Gautier, La Chevalerie (1883), 1st Pillar, 7th Pillar, 10th Pillar.

[4] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 9, 66, 67.

[5] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 2, 47, 57, 59.

[6] Prince Matthew of Thebes, The Templar Code of 1150 AD: The Code of the Knights Templar, Sovereign Magistral Order of the Temple of Solomon (2015); Excerpts from: Temple Rule of 1129 AD; Translated from: Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard; Restored from amendments ca. 1150 AD.

[7] H.D. Hazeltine, “The Influence of Magna Carta on American Constitutional Development in Malden”, in Henry Elliot, Magna Carta Commemoration Essays (1917), p.194.

[8] Lord Judge Master of the Temple, The Greatest Knight, in The Inner Temple Yearbook: 2013-2014, Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, p.14.

[9] Hugh Chisholm, “Fitzwalter, Robert” in Encyclopedia Britannica (1911), 11th Edition, Cambridge University Press, p.449.

[10] T.F. Tout, “Fitzwalter, Robert” in Leslie Stephen, Dictionary of National Biography (1889), London, Smith Elder & Co., p.226.

[11] Lord Judge Master of the Temple, The Greatest Knight, in The Inner Temple Yearbook: 2013-2014, Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, pp.14-15.

[12] T.F. Tout, “Fitzwalter, Robert” in Leslie Stephen, Dictionary of National Biography (1889), London, Smith Elder & Co., p.226.

[13] Gabriel Ronay, The Tartar Khan’s Englishman, London, Cassel (1978), pp.38-40.

[14] Danny Danziger & John Gillingham, 1215: The Year of Magna Carta, Hodder & Stoughton (2003), p.271.

[15] Lord Judge Master of the Temple, The Greatest Knight, in The Inner Temple Yearbook: 2013-2014, Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, pp.12-15.

[16] Sir R. Murray Hyslop, J.P., Some Present Features of the Temperance Crusade (05 July 1920), published in Volume of Proceedings of the Fourth International Congregational Council, The National Council of the Congregational Churches of the United States, New York, The Pilgrim Press, Boston (1921), p.166.

[17] John Stuart Mill, Inaugural Address at University of Saint Andrews (01 February 1867), published in: Littell’s Living Age, Fourth Series, No. 1189, Little & Gay, Boston (1867), p.664.

[18] Edmund Burke, Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontents, 3rd Edition, J. Dodsley, Pall-Mall, London (1770), p.106.

[19] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 12.

[20] Quote Attributed to Margaret Mead (ca. 1950); Frank G. Sommers & Tana Dineen, Curing Nuclear Madness (1984), p.158; Applewhite, Evans & Frothingham, And I Quote: The Definitive Collection of Quotes, Sayings and Jokes for the Contemporary Speechmaker (1992); Ralph Keyes, The Quote Verifier (2006), Introduction, p.xvi.

[21] Elie Wiesel, Nobel Acceptance Speech, accepting the Nobel Peace Prize, delivered to the Nobel Committee in Oslo (10 December 1986).

[22] Vatican, The Catholic Encyclopedia (1912), The Encyclopedia Press, New York (1913), Volume 14, “Templars, Knights”, p.493, Section 1.

[23] Charles G. Addison, Esq., The Knights Templars, Inner Temple, Longman Brown Green and Longmans, London (1842), Chapter 1, p.6.

[24] Keith Laidler, The Head of God: The Lost Treasure of the Templars, 1st Edition, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London (1998), p.177.

[25] Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, 1st Edition, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), Orion Publishing Group, London (2012), p.305.

[26] Malcolm Barber & Keith Bate, The Templars: Selected Sources, Manchester University Press (2002), p.2.

[27] Vatican, The Catholic Encyclopedia (1912), The Encyclopedia Press, New York (1913), Volume 14, “Templars, Knights”, p.493, Section 1.

[28] Alan Butler and Stephen Dafoe, The Warriors and the Bankers, Lewis Masonic, Surrey, England (2006), pp.26.

[29] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 207, 215, 216.

[30] Elie Wiesel, Nobel Acceptance Speech, accepting the Nobel Peace Prize, delivered to the Nobel Committee in Oslo (10 December 1986).

[31] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 6, 9, 59.

[32] Assyrian Sage Ahiqar, Teachings of Ahiquar (“Words of Ahikar”) (ca. 650 BC); Quoted in: Victor Matthews & Benjamin Don, Old Testament Parallels, 3rd Edition, Paulist Press (2006), p.304; Reprinted in:  Rutherford Hayes Platt (Editor), The Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden (1926), A&B Book Distribution (1994).

[33] Lord Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Richelieu; or the Conspiracy (1839), Play: Act II, Scene II; Lord Lytton, The Dramatic Works of Auston, Part IX, Peter Fenelon Collier, New York (1892), p.136.

[34] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 32.

[35] Emile Leon Gautier, La Chevalerie (1883); Translated in: Henry Frith, Chivalry, George Routledge & Sons, London (1891), reconstructed from historical sources since ca. 1066 AD, Chapter II, Part II.

[36] Frank Sanello, The Knights Templars: God’s Warriors, the Devil’s Bankers, Taylor Trade Publishing, Oxford (2003), p.278.

[37] Alan Butler and Stephen Dafoe, The Warriors and the Bankers, Lewis Masonic, Surrey, England (2006), pp.56-57.

[38] Elie Wiesel, Nobel Acceptance Speech, accepting the Nobel Peace Prize, delivered to the Nobel Committee in Oslo (10 December 1986).

[39] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 32.

[40] Dr. Carl Gustav Jung, Psychology and Religion: West and East (1938), Reprinted in: Collected Works of Carl Gustav Jung, Volume 11, Routledge & Kegan Paul (1969), p.140.

[41] Paramahansa Yogandanda, Autobiography of a Yogi, SRF Publishers, Los Angeles (1945), quoting Swami Sri Yukteswar.

[42] Henry de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 1, 18, 19, 34.

[43] Saint Augustine, Letter 211 (ca. 424 AD), “With love for mankind and hatred for sins”; Derived fromJude 1:22-23; Revelation 2:6; Ephesians 4:15; Romans 5:8, 12:9; Supported byI Timothy 1:15-16, 2:1; I Peter 2:17; II Peter 3:9; I John 4:8.

[44] Prince Matthew of Thebes, The Code of Chivalry of 1066 AD: The Universal Code of Knighthood, Sovereign Magistral Order of the Temple of Solomon (2015); Restored and updated from:  Emile Leon Gautier, La Chevalerie (1883), 8th Pillar.