Membership in the Templar Order Induction Into the Templar Order in General Membership

This page features information about joining the Order of the Temple of Solomon, beginning as a Templar Sergeant (men) or Templar Adjutante (women), or as a Temple Guardian, in general membership. Serving as a Sergeant, Adjutante or Temple Guardian is the primary form of full membership in the Order, which is necessary to facilitate earning the official chivalric status of a Knight or Dame in nobility.

Proprietary Research – This site presents new and original research, which is proprietary, from primary sources in the historical record. The numbered source references are the verifiable evidence of all relevant facts. The Templar Order now shares this with the general public for the first time, as part of its core mission of restoring venerable traditions as the pillars of civilization.

Authentic Primary Membership in the Templar Order

 

V (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.org

'The Dedication' by Edmund Blair Leighton (1852-1922), featuring a Templar Knight & his Lady

‘The Dedication’ by Edmund Blair Leighton (1852-1922), featuring a Templar Knight & his Lady

Vatican scholars documented that the Templar Order was comprised of “the knights, equipped like the heavy cavalry… [and] the Serjeants, who formed the light cavalry”, and that more than half of all Templars were Sergeants. Accordingly, the majority of Templar membership was actually comprised of Sergeants, making that position authentically the primary and predominant category of membership in the Order. [1]

The Temple Rule of 1129 AD described Sergeants as those “who wish to serve in charity in the Order of the Temple for the salvation of their souls”, and established that they are enrolled by giving their “commitments” (Rule 67). Sergeants were issued official Templar uniforms, but their tunics were black in color, to distinguish them from the Knights who wore light sand-colored tunics (Rule 68). [2]

The word Sergeant, from the 12th century Old French word ‘sergent’ or ‘serjant’, means a soldier who is an official of a court of nobility. By 1300 AD the duties of a Sergeant included enforcing judgments and orders of state, taking on the role of a sheriff. Later in the 14th century this became known as “Sergeant at Arms”. During the Renaissance period ca. 1545 AD, Sergeant was recognized as a special type of military “non-commissioned officer” or “warrant officer”, essentially a skilled soldier who served the Crown as an independent professional. [3]

Women are also authentically members of the Templar Order, as proven by the historical record, despite being excluded from other medieval chivalric Orders: The Temple Rule mentions a pre-existing “practice” of admitting women (Rule 70), and refers to women among Templars in active service (Rule 72). The later Temple Rule (amended ca. 1150-1300 AD) allows women to support the Knights whenever permission is granted (Rule 679). [4] In 1305 AD the Templar Order acquired at least one female monastery, and the Abbess was admitted and took Templar Vows. [5]

For women, from the traditional French military system, the alternative title of non-commissioned officer or warrant officer which is equivalent to a Sergeant is “Adjutant”. The title comes from the Latin word ‘adjutare’ meaning to “assist” and “support”, based on the root word ‘iuvare’ meaning “to give strength” [6]. Grammatically, the feminine form of the word adds the letter “e” at the end, making the correct title for women “Adjutante” (pronounced like “debutante”).

Historically, Sergeants and Adjutantes are full members of the Templar Order, in active service, participating in all Templar missions. Despite the apparent military style of those titles, they are technically not a “rank” of Chivalry, but rather constitute a distinct class of skilled professionals, directly assisting and supporting the Knights and Dames.

Although Sergeants and Adjutantes are equally Templar Brothers and Sisters of the Order, they have not yet received official status as a Knight or Dame. Sergeants and Adjutantes are in the prime position to become a titled Knight or Dame, through active participation and effective service in the Order, by demonstrating merit to earn knighthood or damehood in nobility.

In the modern Templar Order, men can use the title “Sergeant of the Temple of Solomon”, the post-nominal indication “STS”, or the short form “Templar Sergeant”; Women can use the title “Adjutante of the Temple of Solomon”, the post-nominal indication “ATS”, or the short form “Templar Adjutante”.

The alternative title of “Temple Guardian” is used in situations where it might not be appropriate to call the member a “Sergeant” or “Adjutante”, such as for a person who: (1) intends to earn “Donat of Devotion” status instead of Knight or Dame elevation, (2) is already a nobiliary Knight or Dame of another historical Order but has not yet earned the same in the Templar Order, or (3) holds major Nobility status in a genuine recognized Royal House.

Temple Guardian status is an equivalent position in general membership, also as Templar Brothers and Sisters of the Order on a path towards earning Templar knighthood or damehood.  Men and women can use the title “Guardian of the Temple of Solomon”, the post-nominal indication “GTS”, or the short form “Temple Guardian”.

 

Induction by Giving the Commitment of Service

 

'The Vigil' (1884 AD) by John Pettie (Detail)

‘The Vigil’ (1884 AD) by John Pettie (Detail)

U (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.orgUnder the Temple Rule of 1129 AD, Sergeants and Adjutantes were required only to give their “commitment” (Rule 67), which historically was a contract for a fixed term of service [7]. In the modern Templar Order, this is effectively fulfilled by declaring and signing the Commitment of Service, agreeing to uphold and defend the principles of the Code of Chivalry of 1066 AD, the Temple Rule of 1129 AD, and the Templar Code of 1150 AD.

After completing studies of the Templar Skills Training Program, giving the Commitment of Service constitutes the Induction ceremony for the new Sergeant or Adjutante or Temple Guardian. The term of chivalric service is open-ended, such that the member can hold their titled status at this level for life, for as long as they desire to remain a Templar in the Order of the Temple of Solomon.

 

Regalia for Sergeants Adjutantes and Guardians

 

P (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.orgPopularized ceremonial regalia widely used by self-styled “Templar” themed groups is not authentic to the 12th century Order of the Temple of Solomon, but rather was invented by a 15th century fraternity which is not a chivalric Order [8].

The Temple Rule of 1129 AD evidences that the iconic “white robes” from the first 10 years of the Order (1118-1128 AD) were quickly phased out, replaced by a “burell” shade of light-brown sand or cream color (Rule 68) [9]. Templar every-day working clothes were generally brown in color, and placing the red Templar Cross on the tunics and cloaks, established later in 1146 AD, was soon abolished because “the red cross would also serve as a bulls-eye for the enemies’ arrows and lances” [10]. The Temple Rule allowed only “robes… without any show of pride” (Rule 18), condemned any “pride or arrogance” desiring a “better robe” (Rule 19), required “no excess of vice” in one’s dress (Rule 21), and specifically prohibited “to have excess of… robes of length” (Rule 22). [11]

1-B Sergeants & Adjutantes Badge & Livery CollarThe Temple Rule required “everyone to have the same” uniform (Rule 18), modified only by the Sergeants wearing black tunics, to distinguish them from the Knights (Rule 68) [12]. By historical precedent of the 12th century Teutonic Order, women as Templar Sisters wear the same uniform jacket as their Templar Brothers [13]. Authentic to this tradition, all Templar uniforms are identical, modified only by the color of narrow embroidered trim on the collar and sleeves, and the relevant insignia. Sergeants and Adjutantes thus wear the same uniform as all Knights and Dames and Crown Officers, only indicated with black trim.

The modern Order of the Temple of Solomon has adopted the 14th century Rules of Chivalric Regalia as codified in 1672 AD [14] and established as the international standard system in 1921 AD [15], as other surviving 12th century chivalric Orders have done as precedent [16].

The Templar uniform jacket is both practical and highly versatile, suitable for formal, semi-formal or informal dress. It is conservative with monastic modesty, designed to look modestly regal at ceremonial events, yet reasonably blend in at business meetings among lounge suits, or even to complement safari wear for active field work. Instead of storing it in a closet only for rare events, modern Templars can fully enjoy their uniform for every-day use in diverse situations.

The Order also reestablished proper use of the medieval Livery Badge and Livery Collar, as official insignia reserved for Chivalry and Nobility [17] [18], which were authorized to wear “at all feasts and in all companies” with all dress codes [19]. Sergeants and Adjutantes are distinguished by a “dark steel” metal for the Livery Badge and Livery Collar, which matches well with their embroidered black trim on the uniform jacket.  Temple Guardians are distinguished by a “light steel” metal for the Livery Badge and Livery Collar.

As a result, in situations where the uniform is not used, Templar Sergeants, Adjutantes and Guardians can rightfully use the relevant chivalric badges and collars with smart casual dress, business dress and evening wear, expressing their official Templarism in diverse situations.

Sergeant Regalia (Lounge & Formal) 1250

Adjutante Regalia (Lounge & Formal) 1250

 

Regalia Purchased Separately – Regalia must be purchased separately, after completing studies of the Templar Skills Training Program and being installed as an official Templar by Letters Patent. Regalia costs are not included in the donations made by new members of the Order.

Illustrations May Enlarge Sizes – For the purposes of Illustration, regalia accessories and insignia may appear larger than their actual size proportional to the clothing, for better visibility of detail. Actual sizes are strictly and precisely in accordance with the international standard rules as used by all governments and legitimate chivalric Orders.

 

Induction Package for New Members

 

U (100) Knights Templar Illuminated Letters www.knightstemplarorder.org(SAMPLE) SERGEANT Letters Patent Texture (Web)Upon declaring and signing the Commitment of Service for induction into the Templar Order, the Grand Mastery issues an official document establishing the new member as a Sergeant or Adjutante, or Temple Guardian, of the Order of the Temple of Solomon. More than a mere “certificate”, this is a proper Letters Patent carrying legal validity under chivalric customary law. This reflects the full legitimacy of membership in the Order as the continuation of the 12th century institution of the original Knights Templar.

The Letters Patent is overlaid upon the official watermark of the Order of the Temple of Solomon as a sovereign subject of international law, and bears its heraldic coat of arms as a chivalric Order, ratified by the constitutional seal of the Grand Mastery, and signed by the Grand Master.

(The official Letters Patent is provided as a digitally mastered photographic source file, convenient for sharing as a “best evidence” copy by email, and enabling original quality color printing by the title holder on high grade parchment or other printer paper, for lamination or framing and display in multiple locations as desired.)

The Induction Package also includes a diverse collection of multimedia audiovisual materials, to provide a meaningful experience of deep cultural immersion, and a tangible feeling of being a true part of the Order and its heritage and missions. It gives access to authentic 12th century Templar Music in the context of Templar studies. It also includes a collection of Wallpapers and Screensavers for computers and smartphones, featuring proprietary heraldic artwork of the Templar Order and related historical institutions. These multimedia resources can create an “environment” to transform the “atmosphere” of your daily life, and serve as a practical means of “expression” of your individuality.

 

Suggested Topics Related to this Information

 

Click to access the Membership Registration to Join the Templar Order.

Click to learn more about the Process & Policies of Membership in the Order.

Click to learn about primary Activities & Participation in the Templar Order.

Click to learn about receiving Donat Patron Sponsor status without formalities.

Click to learn about elevation to Knight or Dame in nobility in the original 12th century Order.

 

Academic Source References for this Topic

Full Public Evidence Proving All Facts – All facts in these materials are abundantly proven publicly, directly from primary sources of the historical record and authoritative scholarship, presented as verifiable academic source references, in hundreds of numbered footnotes, consisting of conclusive evidence provided for the world to see.

Color Coded Quotes Indicating Sources – Quotes directly from verifiable sources are color coded, for convenience of visual reference, as follows:  Brown quotes indicate historical sources; Blue quotes indicate scholarly sources; Purple quotes indicate Canon law sources; Red quotes indicate Royal sources.

[1] Vatican, The Catholic Encyclopedia (1912), The Encyclopedia Press, New York (1913), Volume 14, “Templars, Knights”, p.493.

[2] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 67-68.

[3] Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2015), “Sergeant”.

[4] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 70, 72, 679.

[5] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, (1886), p.69, Note 1 to Rule 70; De Wal, Recherches sur l’Ordre Teutonique (1807), Vol.1, p.262.

[6] Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2015), “Adjutant”, “Aid”.

[7] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 67.

[8] John Yarker, The Arcane Schools, Manchester (1909), pp.341-342.

[9] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rule 68.

[10] Frank Sanello, The Knights Templars: God’s Warriors, the Devil’s Bankers, Taylor Trade Publishing, Oxford (2003), pp.14-15.

[11] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 18-19, 21-22.

[12] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 18, 68.

[13] François Velde, Women Knights in the Middle Ages, Heraldica (1996), updated (2003),”Women in the Military Orders”.

[14] Elias Ashmole, Institution Laws and Ceremonies of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, Hammet Publishing, London (1672), with engravings by Wenceslaus Hollar (33 plates), digitized by Folger Shakespeare Library.

[15] Herbert Arthur Previté Trendell, Dress and Insignia Worn at His Majesty’s Court, Harrison & Sons, for Lord Chamberlain’s Office, London (1921).

[16] Noel Cox, The Robes and Insignia of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem, Arma: Journal of the Heraldry Society of Southern Africa (1999-2000), Issue 5.2.

[17] Peter Brown, A Companion to Chaucer, Wiley-Blackwell (2002), p.17.

[18] Chris Given-Wilson, Richard II and the Higher Nobility, in Anthony Goodman & James Gillespie, Richard II: The Art of Kingship, Oxford University Press (2003), p.126.

[19] Susan Crane, The Performance of Self, University of Pennsylvania Press (2002), p.19.

[20] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 1, 6, 9.

[21] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 11, 14.